Strength training exercise comes in many different forms. For instance, you can work every body part using free weights and machines at your local gym.

However, some people don’t have the time to get to the gym for their strength training routine. These individuals still want to build strength, but they’d rather do so using their bodyweight and minimal equipment at home or at the park. 

If you feel the same way, the following bodyweight strength training routine is perfect for you!

1. Push Ups

Push-ups are a key exercise for every calisthenic routine. This exercise is a great starting point for anyone looking to get into bodyweight exercise as a beginner. Push-ups are also effective for seasoned bodyweight exercisers. 

This move can be modified in a variety of ways to make it easier or harder. So pick the variation that works for you!

How to Perform

  • Start with both hands and both feet on the ground, with your shoulders directly above your hands.
  • Slowly lower yourself down by bending your elbows and allowing your shoulders to extend backward.
  • Keep your back straight as you descend toward the ground, aiming to tap your chest to the floor.
  • Once you’ve reached the bottom of your range, push yourself back to the starting position to complete the rep.
  • Perform 10-15 reps per set, for 3 sets per session. Complete this exercise, along with the others listed in this article, 3-4 times per week. 

2. Pull Ups

Pull ups are another commonly used exercise in calisthenics routines. This exercise is very hard for many people, so you may need to modify it at first if you are new to working out. But whatever version of the pull-up you perform, you will be sure to get a great workout for your back and biceps!

How to Perform

  • Grasp the bar with both hands, palms facing away from you.
  • Pull your shoulder blades down and back, then bend your arms as you pull yourself upward, aiming to tap your chest to the bar.
  • Once you’ve reached the top of your range, slowly lower yourself back down to complete the rep.
  • Perform 8-10 reps per set, for 3 sets per session. Complete this exercise, along with the others listed in this article, 3-4 times per week.

3. Air Squats

Squats are the perfect exercise for the lower body. This move works the triple extensor group, which includes the glutes, quads, and calves. Just like the other offerings on this list, squats are a great precursor move for more advanced exercises in the future.

How to Perform

  • Start standing, with your feet about hip-width apart.
  • Bend your knees and slowly lower your hips down until your thighs are parallel to the floor.
  • Once you’ve reached the bottom of your range, stand back up by straightening out your legs to complete the rep.
  • Perform 10-15 reps per set, for 3 sets per session. Complete this exercise, along with the others listed in this article, 3-4 times per week.

4. Standing Dips

Standing dips require parallel bars or gymnastics rings. Therefore, you may need to seek these out at your local park, or elsewhere. If you don’t have access to an area in which you can perform standing dips, you can also perform seated dips on a bench or chair.

How to Perform

  • Grasp the bars firmly.
  • Push yourself up so that you are supported only by your hands.
  • Next, slowly bend your elbows and allow your shoulders to extend backward as you lower your body down. 
  • Once you’ve reached the bottom of your range, push yourself back up into the starting position to complete the rep.
  • Perform 10-12 reps per set, for 3 sets per session. Complete this exercise, along with the others listed in this article, 3-4 times per week.

5. Forearm Planks

Planks are a terrific exercise for the core. This move is the only isometric exercise we have included on this list, but it is extremely effective for building strong abs. 

How to Perform

  • Place your forearms on the floor, along with your feet.
  • Keeping your back straight, maintain a strong contraction in your abdominal muscles.
  • Maintain this position for 45 seconds and repeat 3 times per session. Complete this exercise, along with the others listed in this article, 3-4 times per week.

6. Alternating Lunges

Lunges, much like squats, are a good exercise to include in a calisthenics program. This exercise works the same muscles as squats, namely the glutes, quads, and calves. However, lunges bring an added bonus by providing a balance challenge due to the single-leg requirement of the exercise.

How to Perform

  • Start standing, with one foot about 24 inches in front of the other.
  • Slowly lower your back knee down toward the ground, ending when your knee is about an inch from the ground.
  • Switch sides and repeat the motion.
  • Continue in this manner for 10-12 reps per side, per session. Complete this exercise, along with the others listed in this article, 3-4 times per week.

7. Side Planks

Thus far, we’ve provided exercises that work nearly every muscle in the body. Last but not least, we have an isometric exercise for the obliques. This move, along with planks, helps to strengthen the core musculature significantly.

How to Perform

  • Start by lying on your right side, with your left foot stacked on top of your right foot.
  • Place  your right forearm on the ground, below your shoulder
  • Lift your hips and trunk in the air, creating a straight line through your body.
  • Hold this contraction for 30 seconds and repeat 5 times on each side, per session. Complete this exercise, along with the others listed in this article, 3-4 times per week.

Conclusion

Calisthenic exercises provide an easy way for anyone to get a great workout, regardless of what equipment they have available. Try this workout for the next few months and see what it does for your strength and your physique!

Works Cited

  1. Hollingsworth JC, Young KC, Abdullah SF, Wadsworth DD, Abukhader A, Elfenbein B, Holley Z. Protocol for Minute Calisthenics: a randomized controlled study of a daily, habit-based, bodyweight resistance training program. BMC Public Health. 2020 Aug 15;20(1):1242. doi: 10.1186/s12889-020-09355-4. PMID: 32799849; PMCID: PMC7429724.
  2. Snarr RL, Hallmark AV, Casey JC, Esco MR. Electromyographical Comparison of a Traditional, Suspension Device, and Towel Pull-Up. J Hum Kinet. 2017 Aug 1;58:5-13. doi: 10.1515/hukin-2017-0068. PMID: 28828073; PMCID: PMC5548150.

Source link

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here